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Archaeology Odyssey
by Biblical Archaeology Society
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
Magazine
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Reviews (1)

5-0 out of 5 stars

You Should Dig This


I've subscribed to this since I first read it.The first issue I saw was number two I think.Like many other issues since, that one was devoted for the most part to a single topic -- in that case the Etruscans -- and was rivetting.I hardly noticed I was on the beach sucking up UV and ice water.This is easily my favorite magazine, and certainly is my all-time favorite magazine about archaeology and history.It blew _Discovering Archaeology_ off the map, despite better distribution for its competitor.

A focus on Bible related archaeology seems to be a problem for some narrow-minded folks when they see BAR._Archaeology Odyssey_ is published by BAR, but isn't "Biblical".... ... Read more

Asin: B000060MJP
Sales Rank: 519
Subjects:  1. History    2. Religion & Spirituality    3. Science   


$13.97

Biblical Archaeology Review
by Biblical Archaeology Society
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (9)

3-0 out of 5 stars When they drop the anti-Semitism bickering, it excels
I had a subscription to BAR previously and I absolutely LOVED the articles when they presented excellent photos, interesting finds and deep discussion.My interest started to wane when it seemed that a fair number of discussions turned to how "Dr. X is/was an anti-Semite and therefore his discoveries/theories should be invalidated/discredited/etc.", also implying that Jewish archaeologists' work should be magnified over anyone else's.

I'm not Jewish.I'm also not a racist.The reason why I (or anyone else, I'd presume) would take interest in the magazine was for the aforementioned photos, discoveries, and so forth, not so I can put my money down to read people's discourses on finger-pointing about anti-Semitism.

Yes, racism is bad.Yes, Judaism plays an important part in understanding Biblical archaeology (but not to the point of excluding Christian researchers or thinking anyone outside of Judaism can't be a decent scholar).Even if accusations of anti-Semitism are true about Dr. X, Y, or Z, if their research is scientifically sound, get over it and go argue with Dr. X, Y, or Z on his own turf, not in the magazine, because frankly, I as a reader just don't care about your beef.

I am in agreement with other reviewers who say the magazine excels when it sticks to facts, and is tedious when it goes off on finger-pointing.If you can handle both, buy the magazine.It put me off years ago, but I might consider going back if the quality remains.

5-0 out of 5 stars HERSHEL SHANKS ROCKS!!!
He's been in the rock business a long time, serving as chief editor/founder of BAR, Bible Review and Archaeology Odyssey; he is also president of Biblical Archaeology Society among many other ventures.I've read his Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls which he mainly edited, although he wrote a few articles himself.This is a magazine of substance, one I would love to have a subscription to.The issue of July/August 2004 has an interesting article/interview that Mr. Shanks orchestrated between Elie Wiesel and Frank Moore Cross, the subject being how they understood, approached, studied the Bible, from their perspective, which their lifes' work ultimately revolves around.One, F.M. Cross, comes from a Presbyterian, academic background, the other, Wiesel, a jewish one.Frank Moore Cross contributed several articles to Understanding the Dead Sea Scrolls.He was the only protestant to work on the scrolls among the original team of 7 other people, six of whom were Catholic clerics; he is an expert in this field.And I just love Wiesel's mind, I love how he writes and thinks.That one article, I think is really illuminating, showing how rich in teaching the Bible is regardless of its many detractors, or fumbling misinterpreters.It is, as I've been taught in sunday school, G-d breathed, it's G-d's words, it is a living text even if it contains mostly stories of people long since dead and gone.Elie Wiesel says of it: " Wherever you open it, any page, you know that you are in the presence of something that exists nowhere else."The moral of the article is neither approach, Wiesel's or Cross', toward scripture is wrong, it just simply reflects the richness, the variety of the text.

5-0 out of 5 stars BAR Succeeds Where Boring Professional Journals Fail!!!
BAR presents an overall terrific introduction to the world of Biblical artifacts! Professional archaeologists & world-renowned scholars distill their dry, black-and-white academic publications into a language ordinary, non-technical people can understand & put to use when they study the Bible. What I like in particular is their presentation of vivid color photos that bring the artifacts & excavation sites to life! I appreciate BAR for introducing me to material I never knew existed that complements the Biblical record & helps demonstrate its reliability (such as the mysterious LMLK seal impressions made during the lifetimes of King Hezekiah & the great prophet Isaiah, which inspired me to write my own book on the subject--also available here at Amazon). My only complaint is that the editor occasionally publishes statements by archaeologists/scholars as facts when they actually represent atheistic/theistic biases in disguise. Fortunately, a "Letters to the Editor" section provides a forum for readers to challenge the experts, which makes for some interesting, often entertaining reading! ... Read more

Asin: B000060MGT
Sales Rank: 313
Subjects:  1. Religion & Spirituality   


$13.97

Minerva
by Aurora Publication Ltd
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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list price: $66.13 -- our price: $68.45
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5-0 out of 5 stars Why I love Minerva
Minerva is one of my favorite mags.I studied archeology in graduate school and classical civ in undergrad and I find it a fun way to maintain a flavor of both. I'm also an artist and I've always been facinated by ancient art forms.Most of the items shown are museum quality artifacts, but I get great ideas for my own work from these issues.The articles tend to be obscure for casual readers, but I find them informative and interesting. ... Read more

Asin: B00006KO0Q
Sales Rank: 3215
Subjects:  1. Archaeology   


$68.45

Athena Magazine
by Athena Magazine
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Asin: B00007J6KD
Sales Rank: 12906
Subjects:  1. History   


$34.02

Discover
by Disney Magazine Publishing
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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Editorial Review

Science rules the headlines these days, with new developments each week in genetics, astrophysics, computers, and medicine, and Discover is a great way to get a broad spectrum of science news. Designed for the general reader, Discover translates and interprets many of the same stories professionals peruse in Scientific American. Accessible articles on genetically engineered food, what's living in your pillows, real robots in action, and what makes a Stradivarius sing add up to a truly delightful family science magazine. Each issue brings to light new and newsworthy topics to stimulate dinnertime and water-cooler conversations beyond the mundane, and Discover spices the mix with puzzles, Web links, book reviews, and experiments for amateur scientists.
--Therese Littleton ... Read more

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Reviews (30)

5-0 out of 5 stars Its a magazine ABOUT science
Discover magazine is truly unique among the "science" magazine fray.While other science mags focus on the discoveries themselves, Discover focuses on the process of science, the politics of science, the potential ramifications of discoveries and how very unobjective and unquestioned assumptions about the world cause scientists to ask certain questions or make judgements about certain results.I guess I am saying that Discover is maybe the only "postmodern" science mag out there.That is not to say that one will not learn a lot of cool science facts while reading Discover.But Discover doesnt stop with "just the facts".It never fails to look at science and discoveries in the larger context.

The amazing thing is that it does all of this in a most readable, educating, and entertaining way - and that a magazine with that kind of approach is available at the middle-America supermarket.

5-0 out of 5 stars Discover
Discover has always captivated me with its simple, easy to understand articles but in-depth thought. An excellent choice for people who might actually want to understand a science magazine.

5-0 out of 5 stars Totally Worth Your Time and Money
This is one of the few magazines to which I've ever subscribed.It's one of the best sources available for up-to-date information about scientific developments, without requiring a Ph. D. to understand it.The only problem I have is finding enough time to read all the interesting articles. ... Read more

Asin: B00005N7PT
Subjects:  1. Nature & Wildlife    2. Science & Technology   


$19.95

Mac Addict - Non-disc Version
by Future Network Usa
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
Magazine
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2-0 out of 5 stars MacAddict is a poor brother to the old days of MacUser.
I used to sell and fix Macs since the original Mac 128,
I have owned 14 Macs over 21 years so I have seen it all.
Mac Addict is OK but only because our choices are so slim. Mac User was always the best and I couldn't bother renewing MacWorld after they got nasty with my late payment after I bought it for almost 20 years.

I quit buying MacAddict because of all the free disks. They were full of buggy freebies and Ii turned me off. To keep up with Macs, read the NY Times in the Circuits section and David Pogue's column, web site. Also. if you can afford the Wall St Journal, read Walt Mossberg for all Techy things. He gives a fair review and answers any questions he can, Mac Pc, Camera. The Wash Post on line has a good tech writer for Mac stuff.We reallt don't need a Magazine with the Web. Happy Mac-ing and order TIGER.
I JUST GOT MY NEW IPOD PHOTO 60 gig and a 1gig Shuttle which I use every day in the gym. Buy Applecare and Apple will cover the (probably) 2 batteries. I have an original IPOD (10Gig in 01) and the battery still works and I abused it on many plane trips. It still runs and is my bedroom pod hooked up to my Bose Cd/Radio. yeah I love toys.
Roger Taylor

5-0 out of 5 stars A very Good Mac Magazine
If you read some of the older reviews some make the comment that Mac Addict isn't what it used to be. I'm not sure what they're getting at with that. This magazine has been steadily improving over the years. Lots of reviews, and the included CD is a great tool, filled with free ware, share ware, and samples of commercial software that allow you to try the program before buying it.
If your a Mac engineer it may not be enough for you, but for most of us this is a good source of info.

5-0 out of 5 stars AWESOME!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
This magazine is totally awesome. from the excellent software on the disk, to the FREAKIN-AWESOME reviews, to the silly humor and funny letters on the back pages, this magazine is for any mac user who want's more than the professional MacWorld can give

Projecting humor into a computer magazine is not something many editors can do, bu Rik Myslewski (spelling?) does a great job. I totally recommend it. ... Read more

Asin: B00005Q7DL
Sales Rank: 219
Subjects:  1. Computers & Technology    2. General    3. Mathematics, Computer Science    4. Computers & Internet   


$14.95

New Scientist - Uk Ed
by Reed Business Info E Grinstead
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars Addictive
I have read this magazine for more than twenty years now, so I can say I am addicted. I like to keep informed of what is happening on the science, technology, and policy front. I find the shorter and lighthearted articles ideal for this. The reader does get a good dose of the famous British humour. I can not read the Feedback section without laughing aloud. I also respect New Scientist for daring to take political stances, and exposing bad governmental science policies, or even tackling the environmental movement if they stoop to using questionable science.

5-0 out of 5 stars non scientific view
i have found that this magazine is ideal for the layman.even the most difficult subjects are dealt with such that i can follow them. the range covered is facinating. i look forward to each weeks edition and enjoy every one.it doesnot blind one with science rather it opens ones mind. cannot recommend highly enough. i would award 10 out of 5.

5-0 out of 5 stars The best science magazine available!
This magazine is by far the best I have read.It includes real, cutting edge science of every field.The diversity and insight the articles bring have made it a must have.I am currently finishing up my undergrad degrees in physics, math and neuroscience and this magazine offers up to date research in all fields.One suggestion, but one off the newstand and subscribe through the included leaflet-only fifty one dollars. ... Read more

Asin: B00006KPU2
Sales Rank: 3314
Subjects:  1. Science & Nature    2. General    3. Science   


$153.22

Organic Gardening
by Rodale, Inc.
Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
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Reviews (7)

2-0 out of 5 stars AMEN TO "A SHADOWOF ITS FORMER SELF"
i too have stacks of organic gardening and farming. i love to go back and visit Robert Rodale.Too bad it has become a political bullypulpit. I would not subscribe again with out a major change.

2-0 out of 5 stars A shadow of its former self
I have read and subscribed to Organic Gardening (and Farming)since mid-70's but dropped my subscription in and around 2000. I pick up an issue now and then in newstands, just to "check in" and hope for a return to the "good ole days". The publication used to be superior (find old issues in a library to see the what I mean - especially the 70's) and gave tons of information to all levels of gardeners (some issues used to have 100's of pages, almost all text - though in a smaller format). I still have old copies and to this day find inspiration in those articles. Now its just LARGE glossy pictures, sparse writing, reduced page counts, basic gardening info/lists and more than a dose of Maria Rodale's opinion/politics. I guess their surveys/advertisers tell them this is what "organic" gardeners want...but I would bet Robert Rodale (who edited the mag back in 70's and early 80's) would be upset to see how his daughter has screwed up the magazine. Save your subscription and read the old ones at a library. Yeah...the varieties will be out of date (that's what a seed catalog is good for and/or seedsavers.org) but the info is pure "organic gardening".

3-0 out of 5 stars Organic but thin
Still the leader for US Organic resources, techniques, and current resources, _Organic Gardening_ has been deeply downsized since its inception as _Organic Gardening and Farming_ decades ago.It now contains beautiful pictures, but not much in-depth information in each issue besides A) a plant that can't grow in your zone, B) birds that you'll never see, C) yet another article about tomatoes and D) occasionally good information to help you grow a healthier garden (celery growing tips, Clopyralid in municipal compost heaps).

I subscribe to this magazine primarily to support the EXTREMELY informative Forums found on its webiste, www.organicgardening.com under 'gardener2gardener'. ... Read more

Asin: B00005Q7DO
Sales Rank: 288
Subjects:  1. Gardening (Garden, Gardens)    2. Organic Foods   


$24.96

Popular Science
by Time4Media
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Magazine
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5-0 out of 5 stars What a BLAST !!!
Okay, I've read the other reviews that call this publication shallow, lacking in depth, geared toward young teenagers, etc.I guess if you are looking for twenty page, in-depth technical articles that delve into every minute neutron of a particular subject, then yes, this publication might not be what you're looking for.

But, if you're a regular, average, ordinary guy like me (who would not understand those deep, brainy articles anyway) and you are looking for an entertaining, informative view onto what's new and what's cool, I think you'll be pleased.Very pleased!

Take, for example, a couple of recent issues (see the date of when this review was written).Last month was focused on the future of personal aviation and the people behind the effort to make personal flight more available and affordable, and about the aircrafts they are inventing.Fascinating!Now, can I run out and build myself a prototype after reading the articles?Ummm, no.Do I know a whole lot more about an incredibly fun subject then I did before?Yes!

This month's issue focuses on similar theme: The future of personal space travel and the idea of a space-hotel.When you're done reading it will you be able to build a rocket and fly to the moon?Of course not.But it's informative and educational to the exact level I would want it to be... just enough to make me aware, enlightened, and entertained.

So to all the non-nerds, non-rocket scientists, and non-brainiacs who want a scientific publication by the people, for the people, I think your yearly subscription money will be well spent.

Enjoy!

2-0 out of 5 stars I hope the car companies are getting paid...
About half of every issue of this magazine is devoted to glowing articles about new car models and other commercially-available gadgets.
When I subscribed, I hoped to be kept abreast of new discoveries and theories in science, as well as their practical applications. I was disappointed. Perhaps I'll try Scientific American next.

2-0 out of 5 stars better than a comic book, I guess
When I was a teenager <cough>, I liked this magazine.But over the years I've become really disappointed in the thin gimicky style.Lots of hype and filler, and not much meat.These types of magazines tend to carry numb-brained scare-and-fantasy oriented titles like "Will Einstein's theories cause lethal tidal waves?!?" and "Nanotechnology's promise of immortality".<sigh>.Discover magazine and Scientific American are better, but only slightly.I'm much more impressed with Science magazine.
... Read more

Asin: B00005N7SC
Sales Rank: 68
Subjects:  1. Science    2. Technology   


$14.97

Science Frontiers
by Sourcebook Project
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Asin: B00006KWDL
Sales Rank: 3666
Subjects:  1. Science & Nature    2. Science   


$8.00

American Heritage Of Invention And Technology
by American Heritage
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars The Inventive History of Technology
This magazine is devoted to American inventions and technology that have affected our lives.In essence, this magazine is a historical magazine about American technology.Within each issue are multiple articles about a historical invention.The articles can either focus on the technology or focus on an individual who has been a key contributor to the advancement of that technology.Typically, each issue also has an interview with an inventor or inventors whose contributions have materially affected our lives or society.

The scope of the magazine is broad.There have been articles on the Trans-Canada highway.Another recent issue had an excellent article on tunnel boring machines.In yet another article the development of refinery cracking was described in the context of the development of higher performance engines.The contribution of high octane gasoline to the winning of the air war was mentioned, an interesting piece of trivia of which I was previously unaware.

The scope of the magazine is beyond the physical sciences.Biology and the development of medical technology are also covered.While the magazine is written at a level that an educated non-expert can understand, some of the biology related articles challenge my attention.

This magazine is an excellent source of technological history.However, while the technical jargon used is that appropriate to a technology, this magazine is not light reading for those unfamiliar with a specific field.As an example, I had to read portions of the article on refinery cracking a couple of times to understand the general description of how the cracking process works.Therefore, while I highly recommend this magazine to anyone with an interest in the history of technology, realize that for some readers, for example elementary school students, this magazine could present a reading challenge.

Most articles also provide pictures or other artwork.Frequently this artwork is unavailable from any other magazine source because there are so few magazines that deal with technological history.The quality of the images varies because many of the pictures have not been well-preserved, but in many cases they are the only pictures available.

This magazine frequently mentions the Inventor's Hall of Fame in Akron, Ohio, which is sponsored by the United States Patent & Trademark Office.A number of articles have covered inductees to the Inventor's Hall of Fame, showing that while the articles are historical in nature, they are also currently relevant.

There are a large number of magazines that are either about technology, or have had articles about technology.There are a large number of trade magazines that cover technology.Sometimes these magazines even have articles about the history of an invention.However, the "American Heritage of Invention & Technology" is the only magazine of which I am aware the covers the history of invention and technology.While the focus of the articles is American technology, it is inevitable that the relationship of foreign invention is covered occasionally as well when that technology was important in the development of American technology.I consider this magazine to be excellent for anyone with an interest in historical technology, and is an excellent complement to other historical magazines.

5-0 out of 5 stars This is easily my favorite magazine
I wish this magazine came out more often (as another reviewer said).It would be fascinating for anyone with the slightest interest in the history of technology and engineering.Recent articles have covered vacuum tubes, their history, and why some are still used now, and nuclear power and how that industry stalled in America.I remember reading another article in the mid-'90s about a guy in New York City who shoveled coal for a public school furnace.He explained his job and how hard it was to buy a coal shovel (the hardware store people couldn't believe it).A few years later they followed up with a note that all public schools in NYC had been converted from coal, and that the coal-shoveler's job was MUCH easier maintaining the new furnace.Stories on iron bridges and how Necco wafers are made (with the same machine for 100 years or so) and how buttons are made from seashells and how paper clips are made and how a Hollywood actress designed a frequency-jumping weapons guidance system and all sorts of others are included.Lots of cool articles about how everyday (and not-so-common) technologies went from ideas in someone's mind to products that are ready for use.

5-0 out of 5 stars History of technology for the layman.
Of all the magazines I currently subscribe to, I have had this one the longest.Short, concise articles on everyday items are written for the layman and really open up the history of technology to the reader.I just wish I would have kept all the issues from the start of my subscription. ... Read more

Asin: B00006LK70
Sales Rank: 1188
Subjects:  1. History    2. General    3. Technology   


$15.00

American Scientist
by American Scientist
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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4-0 out of 5 stars American equivalent of Nature
Unlike Scientific American, this journal offers research level articles, spanning all of science. Internationally, it is comparable to Britain's Nature. Except that this journal consciously does not have that emphasis towards the biological sciences.

As you might then expect, the preferred audience is professional scientists (and engineers). Typically, a scientist might direct her paper here, instead of a journal in her field, if she expects that her results might be considered of interest to a broader science community. Oh, and it would raise her profile amongst them, which certainly is desirable.

Another important use of this journal is to search for job vacancies in your field. Many American and overseas universities list tenure track and postdoctoral positions here. But beware! Some fraction of these positions already have preferred candidates. The universities are only advertising here to comply with EEO rules, and may often slant the ad or filter the resultant applications to ensure that only the desired candidate gets the job.

But even in the case where a position actually has no predetermined candidate, often many qualified people will apply. For a tenure track Assistant Professor job, you can expect over 100 applications, from people with PhDs. ... Read more

Asin: B00006K3EU
Sales Rank: 2114
Subjects:  1. Professional & Technical    2. Science    3. Student Fraternities & Societies (united States)   


$30.90

Archaeology
by Archaeological Institute of America
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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3-0 out of 5 stars Not especially pleased
I was told "Archaeology" magazine was a more pop culture venue of the field, as opposed to the dry, academic long winded journals one might otherwise find.I desired a little light reading on the subject, and so I subscribed.

My first issue arrived recently and I was a little disappointed.The reading was lighter than I had anticipated. I found the main articles shorter and less informative than I would have liked. I read a cover article on Alexander's campaigns in Central Asia, and I honestly learned more about the present state of post-Soviet Central Asia than I did about Alexander and his campaigns.

Some of the lesser articles were laughable. Recipes from ancient Sumeria? Speculations about futuristic space archaeology involving Chinese astronauts studying the use of tang in early NASA flights?Give me a break. This goes beyond being a layman's magazine on the subject. This might even go beyond pop culture.

There are some pretty pictures, and they do have a handy section that alerts you to newly published books in the field.But all in all I think high school students would derive more worth from this magazine than university educated adults.At least I received a discounted subscription through Amazon.com.If I had paid full price, I'd be mad.

Bottom Line: National Geographic would be a better buy.It's archaeology articles are better, and still acessible to a layman.

5-0 out of 5 stars Archaeology . . .not just about potshards any more
I echo the positive comments of the other reviewers but want to add one more: this magazine isn't just for archaeology buffs.I suppose some people get excited by old broken vases, but it seems to me that the point of archaeology is to learn about how people have lived at different times.This magazine does a great job covering What It All Means for our understanding of real people's lives.

You'll enjoy this magazine if you're a general reader who enjoys (say) National Geographic.

The magazine also strikes me as pretty open-minded.For example, it has given extensive coverage to both sides of the debate on whether we moderns have the right to dig up dead people who didn't want to be dug up, especially if those dead people are associated with an identifiable modern culture (such as Native Americans).

Plus, the pictures are great.

1-0 out of 5 stars Valuable Objective Data vs. Atheistic Prejudice
Archaeology magazine is a fine resource for staying up-to-date on recent excavations around the world. I can say the same thing for their competitor: "Archaeology Odyssey" (AO). The chief difference between the two is the former's obnoxious worship of Scientism & Darwinism at every opportunity, whereas the latter presents these religious perspectives along with Biblical biases in a mostly balanced manner. Archaeology magazine would be more useful & enjoyable if they would drop their blatantly atheistic agenda & just stick to archaeology; otherwise they should add a clarifier to their title as AO did. I'd recommend "Anti-God Archaeology". ... Read more

Asin: B00005N7OL
Sales Rank: 126
Subjects:  1. Science    2. Archeology   


$15.95

Sky & Telescope
by Sky Publishing Corporation
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
Magazine
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5-0 out of 5 stars A good and ambitious magazine
A magnificent magazine full of breathtaking photos and quality articles. Offers great advice for the hobbyiest. Not only does it keep one abreast of space science I think EVERYONE will find ithighly inspirational.The articles that take on more technical topics in astronomy and Cosmology sometimes leave one wanting but those wanting more accurate and detailed information on these topics are guided by the magazine to other sources. The magazine walks a tightrope and more often than not it is successful.
Recommended

3-0 out of 5 stars Not the old Sky and Tel
I have subscribed, or at least read, Sky and Tel since the 1960's. It's still OK, but a few years ago they flooded the
mag with ads - now it looks like a photography magazine, it has so many. Also, more articles on computing, which is to be expected these days, but which reminds me of a poem (?Whitman)
about his hearing a learned astronomer and then just walking outside to look at the stars.Once in a while astronomy involves politics, and then you find that the editorial staff
is indeed P.C. (and not "personal computer" this time).
ASTRONOMY is better for the amateur observer and if you are
truly a scientist, and can read German, try Sterne und
Weltraum.

5-0 out of 5 stars Still true to its mission
S&T was originally developed for amateur astonomers and over its history it has remained true to that mission.That's why there are so many ads and features on equipment.I've been subscribing for about thirty years and have seen many changes to the magazine (I still miss the old cursive "Sky" in the banner but, oh well).On the whole, I think the quality and depth of the articles on cosmology and astrophysics have improved over the years and new features, such as the mission updates, have improved the magazine's coverage.And the gorgeous photography!Yes, many of these are Hubble images or are made with sophisticated equipment.However, contrary to some reviewers' remarks, superb images, sometimes comparable to some of the images in the magazine, can still be made with a good 8 or 10 inch instrument in the backyard, especially with the advances that have been made in CCD imaging.S&T remains the best in the field for amateurs and for anyone with an interest in astronomy. ... Read more

Asin: B00008BFWB
Sales Rank: 807
Subjects:  1. Science & Nature    2. General    3. Astronomy   


$45.62

Astronomy Now
by Pole Star Publications
Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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4-0 out of 5 stars Astronomy Now magazine
The magazine is terrific. With regular updates and rich photography, "Astronomy Now" is a must for all astro-enthusiasts!! It, incidentallyy is the best-selling astronomy magazine in the UK ... Read more

Asin: B00007KPIT
Sales Rank: 7486
Subjects:  1. Astronomy   


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The Economist
by The Economist Newspaper Group, Inc.
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars No other weekly like it
This is, plainly put, the best news periodical out there.Sure, others can "report" what's happening in the world, but The Economist includes analysis and puts events in proper perspective to provide the much sought after "why?".Upon hearing of the magazine, the title seemed to suggest a dry, tough read about finance and economics.Not so at all.It's sort of like an international, intelligent version of Time or Newsweek, with a more objective and rational feel.It's a surprisingly easy read as well, with a great informal British style, infused with wit throughout yet always smart and informative.Well worth the price.

5-0 out of 5 stars If you're going to read only one news periodical . . .
The Economist should be it.It is the most thorough single news periodical out there, period.Enjoy.

5-0 out of 5 stars It Really Is That Good
Read one Economist article, and you'll know why it's considered in a league of its own, and why everyone from business leaders to Prime Ministers to regular people like you and me love it so much.

One of the best attributes the Economist possesses is its ability to present news and analysis on an unsurpassed intellectual level, while at the same time being very much down to earth, at times even getting comical commentary in. I have never once read an article where I sensed bias. I'm very good at detecting bias, and even when it perhaps is bias I'm inclined with, it ruins the legitimacy for me. You'll notice they do not attribute articles to specific authors. This is because the magazine wants each article to represent the Economist as a whole, and not a particular person. It's a refreshing formula, in an age where some writers feel the need to be long winded and rush to grab individual attention at every turn.

The Economist has been around for 150+ years for good reason. It holds incredible integrity, and it doesn't cater to anyone.

For international news and perspective in particular, I have yet to find a weekly publication on the Economist's level for the mere reason there are none. I'm a student in International Affairs, and the insight and rationality found in the pages devoted to the world, 1/3 of each issue in fact, is the crowning jewel of the magazine. That's in addition to its coverage on business, finance, technology, arts and books. It's truly a complete package.

You probably couldn't do anything better to improve your mind and worldview with a little over $100 than to buy an Economist subscription. ... Read more

Asin: B00005NIP1
Sales Rank: 39
Subjects:  1. News & Politics    2. Business    3. International    4. Business News   


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Fortean Times
by I Feel Good Ltd
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars Curiousier and curiousier........
This is the one and only magazine I have been subscribing to for 4 years now, I just don't want to miss getting an issue at the bookstore. This magazine always tweaks my intellect and satisfies my curiousity. Also being a British publication you don't have that annoying 'continued on page 88' while reading an article , the article's pages run continously to the start of the next article.

5-0 out of 5 stars Review of Number 161: Aug 2002
I've been with the Fortean Times since way back at issue 31. Over the years since then it has got more glossy, but it still never ceases to amaze me. This latest issue is no exception.

Fortean Times is a monthly mag founded in 1973 to continue the work of Charles Fort, who, in the early part of the 20th Century was among the first to speculate that mysterious lights in the sky might be from outer space; coiner of the term "teleportation", and chronicler of all that these days are considered the realm of "The X Files". The magazine continues his tradition of reporting "damned" phenomena in an objective manner.

The "damned" covers a wide range, and in the pages of this magazine you'll find articles on such varied subjects as religious miracles, the latest happenings in UFOlogy, sightings of strange or out-of-place animals, and the weirdest cartoons in Christendom. Regular favourites include the "Strange deaths" column which details the many varied ways the human race can find to shuffle off this mortal coil.

This issue is well up to usual standards.
First up in the news section there is a report on how the Queen Mother's death led to a holiday park fire when the curse of the Koh-I-Noor diamond struck again; a reported 120 million year old map found carved in stone in the Ural mountains; a report of a family of nine children, all given up for adoption, who became close friends without knowing of their relationship and some great snippets on current advances in astronomy - including the interesting news that out towards the stars Pioneers 10 and 11 are slowing down. Not by much, but nobody knows why!

There's more news on an American on trial for murder who believed he was back in time killing Adolf Hitler; news of man-made structures off the coasts of Malta and the Isle of Wight; the latest on the Roberto Calvi Itlaian masonic banking affair; how to fold a dollar bill to see a representation of the Twin Towers burning; the origins of the stories about "The Curse of the Mummy" and the latest from the world of cryptozoology, including news on the search for a hairy man-beast in North East India.

And all that is before we get to the main articles, the meat of the magazine.

The first of the feature articles is a long piece on David Berkowitz, the "Son of Sam" murderer, who the writer Jon Vincent Sanders believes was not working alone, and was a member of a black magic underground in New York. I wasn't quite convinced by the article - it covered the history well, but didn't provide any strong evidence for the writer's theory.

The second article, by FT editor Paul Sieveking, is the sort of thing the magazine does so well. It is a run down of the history of feral children - those brought up by cats, dogs or monkeys. The writer traces many stories from all ages of human history, summarises the main points succinctly, and provides an exhaustive list of references. This is the way research on so-called "Weird" topics should be done.

The main article in this issue is a long profile of Sci-Fi legend Philip K Dick, detailing both his place in Fortean literature, and also his influence on current Sci-Fi cinema, particularly with reference to the latest blockbuster "Minority Report". Impressively, FT has garnered opinions on Dick from most of the big names in Brittish genre fiction, and some of them are very forthright in their views. There's also an investigation into Dick's very own "damned" life, including the super-intelligence VALIS that he believed he was in communication with.

The rest of the magazine is taken up by a couple of short articles, including a look at some of the odder events of the Queen mother's life, an extensive letters section that's, as usual, entertaining and enjoyable, and a reviews section covering books on George Bush's connection to big business, Jack the Ripper, and seeing ghosts; a review of "Minority Report" and more of the brilliant cartoons that are studded through the mag.

I write genre fiction, and this magazine is a constant source of ideas for stories, but above all else, it's the entertainment that counts, and FT provides that, consistently.

5-0 out of 5 stars I have subscribed for several years now.
There is ALWAYS something interesting in FT. I grant that it's a bit like World Weekly news with better writting and geared to a different audience, but the odd news stories (yeah, some of them aren't true sad to say) are worth the price alone. They heve a travel article and THE HIEROPHANT is incredibly good, there are book reviews and they aren't just saying it's all true, there was an excellent article about faking your own ghost photos and they do make attacks on the obviously misinformed. It's a fun read and I always look forward to my new issue. A few years back they had this article about a crop circle convention, on one hand the people wo say aliens made them on the other the group that say THEY made them. ... Read more

Asin: B00007AXGK
Sales Rank: 1920
Subjects:  1. Psychology. Parapsychology. Occult   


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Infinite Energy
by New Energy Foundation
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list price: $29.95 -- our price: $32.82
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Asin: B00006KI8R
Sales Rank: 4618
Subjects:  1. Professional & Technical    2. Science    3. Physics   


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National Geographic Magazine
by National Geographic Society
Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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5-0 out of 5 stars Photographs with the added bonus of good writing
I received National Geographic as a gift because I was getting too old for Ranger Rick. (Quite the jump, I must add).I read my first issue and immediately wanted more.

The pictures, as many have said, are always stunning, and the writing is spectacular.Obviously, such a world-renowned magazine must be spectacular.

My only complaint is that it takes so long to read that, with my busy schedule, I don't ever have time to read anything else.They tend to pile up, but I read them all eventually- I can't bear the thought of just putting an unread issue straight into the rack with the read ones.It really is fantastic and makes a great Bar or Bat Mitzvah gift.

4-0 out of 5 stars A fantastic publication despite its liberal slant
Now now!Before you get mad at me for my "liberal slant" comment in the title of this review, let me remind you that I also said it's "a fantastic publication.":-) No matter what your political stance on hot button issues such as global warming and oil, you have to admit that National Geographic takes a liberal stance.Is that good or bad?Entirely up to you to decide.But to their credit, they do a VERY fair job, within the articles, of explaining and examining ALL aspects and points of view.

I subscribed because like most of us, I've always been a fan of their photographs, but as they began to arrive in the mail I found myself poring over each and every page, reading every issue from cover to cover.I've learned so many wonderful things about cultures and people I will never get a chance to see in real life, and I've educated myself on issues that otherwise would remain a mystery.

One of the most enjoyable aspects of having a subscription is the inserts that come in almost every issue.My all time favorite thus far has been a composite map of the entire world at night, showing natural gas vents, wild fires, and city lights across the globe.Fascinating!

For the almost embarrassingly low price of $49.00 a year I am more educated, informed, and inspired then I was before I subscribed.

5-0 out of 5 stars It does not get better
This is the best ever magazine in all fields....though they are getting mean nowadays and reducing the number of pages per issue!!! It is really a great reading from cover to cover...everybody must get it!!! ... Read more

Asin: B00005NIOH
Sales Rank: 12
Subjects:  1. Nature & Wildlife   


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Natural History
by Natural History Magazine Inc
Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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Published by New York's treasured American Museum of Natural History, Natural History gives a monthly peek into current goings-on in the broad realm of natural history and science. Dinosaur buffs, world travelers, animal lovers, stargazers, birders, and history fanatics alike will find articles and photographs to pique their interests. Less weighty than its chief peer, National Geographic, Natural History takes the armchair traveler into the world of bugs, archeological excavations, and the rest of the universe. Without ever reading like a specialized journal, the magazine creates an intelligent and in-depth discussion of each topic, and articles are illustrated with photographs, drawings, charts, and maps. Perhaps because National Geographic covers so much cultural and physical ground, Natural History features more focused articles on scientific discovery. Still, it's a glimpse into a vast world, and a good substitute for a monthly visit to the Museum of Natural History. --Gilia Angell ... Read more

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5-0 out of 5 stars Finest Popular Magazine on Natural History
"Natural History" is the official popular journal published by the American Museum of Natural History, the oldest - and largest - museum of natural history in the Western Hemisphere and without question, one of the world's greatest museums. In its pages it has featured brilliant essays by the likes of Roy Chapman Andrews, Margaret Mead, and Stephen Jay Gould, to name but a few of the many eminent scientists - both museum staff and outsiders - who have contributed superb articles on natural history to this magazine. It has retained an emphasis on scientific discovery, publishing articles pertaining to ecology and other aspects of evolutionary biology (including paleobiology), geology, astrophysics, archaeology and anthropology. Recent issues have included brief articles on biomechanics of various living organisms, those pertaining to recent and current exhibitions such as the Petra exhibition on display at the museum from the Fall of 2003 to early Summer 2004, and current ecological and anthropological research. Current museum scientists, most notably Neil deGrasse Tyson, the director of the Hayden Planetarium, often report in these pages on their ongoing research as well as on issues of a more general nature that might interest a scientifically-literate public. And to its credit, it has not shied away from controversy, publishing for example, an issue on so-called "Intelligent Design", which is seen by its adherents as a competing scientific alternative to evolution via Natural Selection, but lacks any scientific credibility from professional scientists, science educators and like-minded members of the general public.

5-0 out of 5 stars my oppinion
i enjoyed the magizine. it was also helpful in school.i learnt a lot from reading it

5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Articles
This is an outstanding journal.The articles are diverse, informative, and current.Other than possibly Scientific American, there is not better journal for the life sciences.

An earlier reviewer critized the journal for not using the metric system.Personally, I do not find this to be a problem with a journal which is primarly qualitative and not quantitative. ... Read more

Asin: B00005N7RQ
Subjects:  1. Science & Nature    2. Nature    3. Natural History . Biology    4. History    5. Nature & Wildlife   


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