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    The Wilson Quarterly
    by Pro Circ
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $24.00 -- our price: $20.00
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    Reviews (8)

    5-0 out of 5 stars Top Quality
    The art of short non-fiction writing lives on.I have subscribed to this magazine since 1981, a very different world then, but have been consistently impressed with WQ.This magazine has always demonstrated an excellence in style, content and quality of writing.My favorite is that it has reviews of other magazine articles, something I always look forward to.If controversy or an edge is what you are looking for, this may not be your cup of soup.But if you are looking for a condensed and concise article on a subject you may know nothing about, coming away feeling just a little bit more informed about the world, I can't think of a better source.

    2-0 out of 5 stars Organ of the Radical Center
    How to characterize this magazine? It's a cross between Reader's Digest and US News and World Report, with a higher Flesch-Kincaid rating. Most of the articles read like popularizations of the output of political science departments (with a bias toward Princeton, of course). In my year's subscription, I found it a little too safe, accommodating, and middling, and I did not renew.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent.
    This is definitely the cream of the crop.I would recommend this publication to anyone.It is well-rounded, thoughtful, and aware of present events without being sensationally consumed by them.Definitely worth subscribing. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005NIP3
    Sales Rank: 814
    Subjects:  1. Literary    2. News & Politics   


    $20.00

    The New Yorker
    by Conde Nast Publications Inc.
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $163.70 -- our price: $39.95
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    Editorial Review

    Founded in 1925, The New Yorker hardly changed for its first 60 years, both in its dry, type-heavy design and in its reputation as a writer's and reader's haven. In 1987 it was on only its second editor when management decided to shake things up. A rocky decade ensued, but The New Yorker is now back at the top of its game under David Remnick's editorship. Each issue offers commentaries and reporting on politics, culture, and events, with a focus that's both national and international; humor and cartoons; fiction and poetry; and reviews of books, movies, theater, music, art, and fashion. Several times a year special issues focus on a theme--music, fashion, business. The writing is mostly first-rate, frequently coming from top literary and journalistic talents. The New Yorker's weekly issues can seem overwhelming--so much good stuff to read, piling up so fast!--but it's as easy to dip in for a small snack as it is to wade in for a substantial meal. --Nicholas H. Allison ... Read more

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    4-0 out of 5 stars good magazine with sensible left of center views
    New Yorker is one of the best magazines available in the US. It has a good mixture of articles on current events, culture, fiction, humor. And one shouln't forget those notorious cartoons. The lengths of the articles range from the very long to the very short, and should amply sustain one's weekly need for reading material.
    Please be aware that all articles have a coat of liberal paint. But the New Yorker is probably the most sensible left of center media source in this country.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Magazine to Impress Others that You'll Actually Like
    I have been subscribing to the New Yorker for five years now, and it has been a very enlightening experience.The New Yorker does its part in covering big news stories, but it's not really a news magazine.The perspectives are unique (and admittedly lean to the left), and the kind you're not likely to get elsewhere.The authors use the first person because they tend to be part of the stories they're covering.Take Jon Lee Anderson, probably the most credible reporter covering the Middle East today.His "Letters From" various cities involve accounts of his meetings with locals and leaders.

    Other segments are more like NPR stories--unique perspectives on largely uncovered topics that aren't time-sensitive.You'll get in-depth looks into developments in medicine, law, architecture, etc., that otherwise wouldn't get on your radar unless you were in that profession.And, the writers incorporate the "larger questions" in stories focused on recent events.Like Malcolm Gladwell's recent account of a playwright who plagiarized material from a former article written by him.He parlayed his personal struggle into a good summary of legal and ethical positions on the use or development of one person's idea by another.

    I have grown to look forward to reading the Fiction selection each week.Sometimes I don't like the piece, but I enjoy getting the chance to read writers that I normally wouldn't and those that I normally would.

    Additionally, the magazine has added more dedicated issues--most recently the "Food" issue, in addition to standbys like the "Style" and "Fiction" issues.I loved the "Food" issue, especially one writer's account of the search for truly authentic pasta that involved a work night in Mario Batali's kitchen and a trip to Italy.

    I enjoy the balance of hard news, balanced interest stories, and arts that the New Yorker provides.I began my subscription to get a different perspective than what I got from local Southern news, and I keep it for the same reasons and many more.

    1-0 out of 5 stars This magazine is extremely left wing
    I am a physician and purchased this to have a few magazines in my waiting room.I will not renew my subscription because this magazine has become so left wing.The covers and articles are too contriversial and one sided.I will continue with Smithsonian, Scientific American and People as my waiting room magazines.I was a bit surprised by how extremely left wing this magazine has become. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7T5
    Subjects:  1. Literary    2. News & Politics    3. Regional   


    $39.95

    London Review of Books
    by Pro Circ
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $94.80 -- our price: $35.00
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    5-0 out of 5 stars best literary review in the world today
    The London Review of Books is simply the best generalist journal on topics of literature, the arts, culture, history, politics, philosophy published in the world today--it now beats the NY Review of Books in terms of giving you the full picture and leaves the TLS back in the dust.If you want to get your bearings in the world ofculture and politics, this is must reading.

    Denis Jonnes
    Washington D. C./Kitakyushu, Japan

    2-0 out of 5 stars What the....?
    I subscribed to this publication expecting to read reviews of various fiction/non-fiction books - what it turns out to be is a series of editorials, premised around virtually all non-fiction.All very high-brow and frankly, quite boring.The one item worthwhile is the classifieds.I think I'll ask to cancel my subscription and obtain a refund.I anticipated something that would help me in finding great books to read but after 4 issues, I haven't seen anything of interest.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Does Not Compare
    There is no comparing the incredibly honest reviews on Amazon with the high-brow reviews found in the LRB. One surveys average readers, and the other is the opinion of people who make a living writing about books. I, Brockeim, am more like the people than the professionals, and believes most of you are as well. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7XF
    Sales Rank: 527
    Subjects:  1. Literary   


    $35.00

    Wine Enthusiast
    by Pro Circ
    Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $55.30 -- our price: $35.00
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    3-0 out of 5 stars Okay for the price, but could use some improvements
    Wine Enthusiast is an average, decently priced, magazine about, of all things, wine. Less of a lifestyle magazine than Wine Spectator, and less serious in tone than Wine Advocate, Wine Enthusiast has its merit in that it focuses solidly on wine without the pretentious rambling that sometimes diminishes its competitors. Most of its articles are mostly accurate, if in a rudimentary way. Wine Enthusiast does not seem to rate as many wines as its competitors, which can be a problem for vertical comparisons of certain wines, including some well-known examples from Bordeaux and Burgundy. As such, I would probably not recommend Wine Enthusiast to the serious collector. Nonetheless, for its price, Wine Enthusiast offers value and adequate ratings and reviews of many wines, although I have some questions as to how they choose which wines to rate when they leave out many Sauternes in favor of white zinfandels.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Good value but not top-level
    Wine Enthusiast magazine is a second-class (but not third-class) cousin to Wine Spectator magazine. Based on my reading experience with the magazine over the last year, it offers fewer articles and fewer tasting reviews. The quality of the editorial/opinions is close to comparable, though. This magazine can be a reasonable choice to read and, since it does cost just a bit less than Wine Spectator, it can offer reasonable value. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7TK
    Sales Rank: 809
    Subjects:  1. Food & Gourmet    2. Wine   


    $35.00

    Cigar Aficionado
    by M Shanken Communications Inc
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $29.70 -- our price: $19.95
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    Editorial Review

    Unlike most of its counterparts in the men's magazine ranks, Cigar Aficionado targets a classier, more cultivated man, the guy who'd rather smoke a Montecristo and savor the indulgence of a cherry-red '65 Mustang convertible than read about what Hollywood stars have to say while they eat lunch. It's the mature man's Esquire, a magazine that's more interested in yachts, rum, and golf than it is in this season's new fashions. As the name suggests, at the heart of the magazine is the cigar, with articles investigating everything from California smoking laws to Cuban politics. It's true that you don't have to smoke cigars to enjoy Cigar Aficionado, but Cigar Aficionado is a magazine that will try its very hardest to get you to enjoy cigars. --Jon Groebner ... Read more

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    5-0 out of 5 stars "If I cannot smoke cigars in heaven, I shall not go!"
    I have been smoking cigars for 2 years now and I have no regrets, well actually just one, not subscribing to the Cigar Aficionado magazine earlier. This magazine will make you into a true cigar smoker just after reading one article. For those people who are thinking about making cigars their new hobby then go out and buy this magazine as you will be extremely appreciative in the end. Well, I'm off now to enjoy my Montecristo No. 4 cigar, so long.

    5-0 out of 5 stars A great book for a man to read on a sunday
    This magizinewith a cigar on a sunday afternoon by the pool,is one of those great delights. I look foward to esspically when then newest issue comes out .This mag is always filled with intersting facts and arcticles, and just plain cool stuff to read about .I would remcomend anybody read this magazine even if your are not a smoker .

    5-0 out of 5 stars Great man's mag!
    Great mag!
    So many of the mags for men just don't cut it with me.Think they are aimed at the 16-20 age group which I left a long time ago.
    I have had many subcriptions to various mags over the years and this is one of the few that I still have even though I seldom smoke cigars anymore. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7UC
    Subjects:  1. Lifestyle Culture & Religion    2. General    3. Manufactures    4. Food & Gourmet    5. Men's Interest   


    $19.95

    Asimovs Science Fiction
    by Penny Press
    Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars
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    list price: $40.50 -- our price: $32.97
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    5-0 out of 5 stars Some of the best science fiction shorts out there
    Regular readers of my reviews are probably getting sick of me mentioning Kage Baker, but I have to credit her for getting me to try a lot of things that I wouldn't normally try if she hadn't been a part of them.Asimov's Science Fiction magazine is another time where this is the case.While I have boughtFantasy & Science Fiction magazine every month for a while now, I would also check Asimov's to see if it had a Baker story.If it did, I would buy it.What I have found, however, is that I have enjoyed most of the other stories in the issues I have bought as well.Thus, from now on I will be buying it every month too.

    Much like Fantasy & Science Fiction, Asimov's contains mostly science fiction stories of various lengths (short story, novelette, novella) along with a couple of columns and some cartoons.The difference between the two is that Asimov's contains no fantasy (though some of Mike Resnick's stories have a fantasy feel to them).However, the magazine likes to concentrate on character-based science fiction, so you won't see a lot of "technology first, character second" stories in the magazine.Personally, I think that's a good thing as hard science fiction turns me off.If you're more into the hard sciences, you may find stuff in here to interest you, but there's a good chance that you won't.

    Occasionally, there will be guest editorials (they printed George R.R. Martin's Guest of Honor speech from Worldcon in the October/November issue).There's always an "On Books" column, sometimes written by Paul Di Filippo, sometimes by Peter Heck.The authors use this column to recommend books that you may not have come across.Robert Silverberg opens each issue with a "Reflections" column that can cover everything from space exploration to ideas on story-writing.James Patrick Kelly occasionally is featured with an "On the Net" column, examining various science fiction web sites and other online activities.Unlike Fantasy & Science Fiction, there is often some poetry included as well.Finally, there is a calendar of upcoming conventions that covers the world so you can always find someplace to go if you need to get together with a group of fans.

    The bread and butter of the magazine, though, are the stories.Each story has an introduction from the editor (currently Gardner Dozois, though that will change to Sheila Williams with the January issue), which may explain the genesis of the story, or just tell us how long it's been since that author has appeared in Asimov's.One of the things about Asimov's that is different is that it often serializes stories that will eventually appear in book form.Allen M. Steele's Coyote series has been serialized over the last couple of years with all of them being collected in two books (Coyote from a couple of years ago, and the upcoming Coyote Rising).Also, Charles Stross' Accelerando has been featured in recent issues.The one drawback to this is for readers who only pick up the occasional issue.For instance, "Survivor" in the October/November issue didn't really mean a lot because I've missed everything that came before it.It does reward regular readers, though.

    Asimov's has many writers who write almost exclusively for that magazine, or at the very least the authors submit their stories to this magazine for first refusal.My favourite, Kage Baker, only seems to appear here, with only one story that I know of appearing in Realms of Fantasy.Allen M. Steele is another.Robert Reed seems to be featured everywhere (I swear that guy is churning them out like he's a machine) but he is featured a lot in Asimov's.

    The magazine is bound just like Fantasy & Science Fiction, however the cover is thin paper rather than thicker stock, so it will tear a bit easier.This does have the advantage that you can sometimes leave it lying open for reading (though this only works if you're toward the middle of it).It also means it can be rolled up if necessary.

    The only other fault I have with it, and this is strictly a personal thing, is that the stories don't always grab me as much as they do in Fantasy & Science Fiction.This is mainly because I'm more into fantasy than science fiction, so this certainly wouldn't be the case for everyone.While the hit and miss ratio varies from issue to issue, I can say that I have never skipped a story in the magazine.Again, that's a benefit of short fiction.You're not going to waste a lot of time on them.

    If I had to choose between the two magazines, I would definitely choose Fantasy & Science Fiction.However, Asimov's is certainly good enough that it's easy to make room for both of them.Plus, by picking them both up, I feel like I'm doing my part in keeping short fiction alive.It's only a small part, but every little bit helps.

    David Roy

    5-0 out of 5 stars Possibly the greatest SF magazine in existence.
    I would encourage everyone to subscribe, and help support the magazine. Asimov's Science Fiction (along with Fantasy & Science Fiction, and Analog Science Fiction & Fact) is truly the lifeblood of the science fiction genre. Short fiction has the unique advantage of being able to develop new worlds in a shorter amount of space than one might find in a novel, although in many cases a large portion of this world-building is left to the reader's imagination. Thus, good short fiction is able to convey a true sense of transaction between writer and reader, giving the impression that more has been said than has actually been specifically stated.

    Asimov's is no exception. It publishes some of the best fiction on the market today, by James Patrick Kelly, Michael Swanwick, Robert Silverberg, and Nancy Kress to name but a few. In addition, it still manages to introduce new writers to the field; indeed, it is one of the principle markets for finding and developing vital new talent for the continued success of science fiction as a whole. I believe it to be one of the most important publications in SF today. So, please, subscribe. You don't know what you're missing.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Amazing!
    This magazine is simply the best SF out there! Every issue goes well over 100 pages and it's a monthly! The June Issue has some great storys in it, so go pick it up at your local convience store, now! This magazine is awesome! ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7VQ
    Sales Rank: 1024
    Subjects:  1. Literature    2. General    3. Literary History And Collections    4. Literary   


    $32.97

    Foreign Policy
    by Foreign Policy
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
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    5-0 out of 5 stars Excellent Quarterly View of the World
    This is an excellent magazine that is put out quarterly with the best writers of Foreign Policy in the world writing articulate and current articles about the state of affairs of various countries, problem spots and emerging issues. My favorite article is their myth breaking of a controversial issue. The myth-breaking feature of the quarter states a general perception and then breaks it down into usually 10 myths that support that perception. They then challenge each myth by a more accurate and fact full analysis that essentially defeats the myth giving you a more accurate state of affairs. One such article is the perception that terrorists have hijacked the Muslim religion, which is a myth as the writer indicates through various arguments that the opposite is true. Another such article was about the Neocons in the Bush administration, by breaking the myths about the Neocons, the article gives you a better understanding about what they really think and what their goals are. This quarter's magazine features a great article about Colin Powell explaining why he dos not seem to have a strong presence as a Secretary of State while he still maintains a positive public rating. An interesting contrast that FP fully explains.

    The only negative about the magazine is that comes out only quarterly but these well thought out articles provide a lot to digest in between.

    5-0 out of 5 stars FP Deserves Its Excellent Reputation
    FP is published by the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Articles in the current issue (May-June 2004) are about al Quaeda, world trade in small arms, selling to the world's four billion poor people and American public opinion on Iraq, terrorism, North Korea and free trade.There are also articles on such subjects as saving endangered species and a comparison of Kerry and Bush on foreign policy. FP is marking the second anniversary of the magazine's ambitious attempt to rank the world's 21 rich countries on "how their policies help or hinder social and economic development in poor countries." First place on this year's report card goes to the Netherlands while the United States is ranked seventh.

    There are still other articles plus reviews and a lively letters section. The latter is devoted solely to reactions to an earlier article by Samuel Huntington on the impact on the United States from Hispanic immigration.

    The contributors include mostly academics with a sprinkling of journalists and other professionals. Some of the recent writersare Allen J. Hammond, C.K. Prahalad, Jason Burke, Steven Kull, Kenneth Rogoff, Minxin Pei, Tamar Jacoby and Patrick Buchanan. The articles cover timely topics and they are written in a highly readable style. The reader does not necessarily have to be an academic to enjoy this publication. FP definitely deserves its reputation for excellence.

    3-0 out of 5 stars Yawn.Provocative it is not.
    I find Foreign Policy to be a bit too cocky, dull, and long-winded.I subscribed hoping to find stimulating intellectual discussion, but Foreign Policy can't seem to shake its centrist shackles.Its articles are less well-researched and provocative than they are lengthy, and I was less than impressed with many so-called "expert" authors who seized the opportunity to publish op-eds rather than engaging original arguments.Foreign Policy's decision to feature Samual Huntington's bunk argument regarding the Hispanic "threat" to America on the cover is a case in point.

    On the other hand, Foreign Policy is not a bad read if it is considered supplemental.Just don't expect to be blown away. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005NIQJ
    Sales Rank: 377
    Subjects:  1. Government & Politics    2. General    3. America . United States    4. International    5. News & Politics   


    $19.95

    Conde Nast Traveler
    by Conde Nast Publications Inc.
    Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $54.00 -- our price: $15.00
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    Editorial Review

    As the title implies, Traveller offers more than just articles and advice on vacation planning. Beyond resort and hotel reports, its insightful, thorough, and informative features delve into regional culture, transportation, and cuisine, serving those who are as interested in actually experiencing another part of the world as they are in escaping their own. Traveller also offers pragmatic articles on the perils of visiting foreign countries, such as car insurance (or the lack thereof), medical care, and crimes such as pickpocketing. Other features pinpoint charming diversions--a roadside dried-coconut vendor on Maui's Hana Highway, Seattle's surrealExperience Music Project museum, the latest boutique hotel in Miami's South Beach, or a tiny crêpe shop in Paris. The focus is on more opulent destinations--those looking to do London on $15 a day should look elsewhere. But whether you'll travel by mountain bike, Sherpa guide, or Learjet, and whether you're on a lengthy sojourn or a weekend spa getaway, Traveller inspires a voyager's dreams. --Beth Massa ... Read more

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    3-0 out of 5 stars Some good articles,, but disappointing
    I have subscribed to Traveler for a while now.Before I picked up that subscription, I was already subscribing to National Geographic Traveler and Budget Travel.I have to say that for the average, middle-class person, Budget Travel is the most practical.I enjoy reading it the most because I want to know how to get a great deal . . . not how to get the most for your dollar in First Class.This magazine is definitely geared toward the more affluent traveler.It is also geared toward the sophisticated, chic traveler--not the average traveler.While it is interesting to read about places the wealthy are able to afford and dream about going there, I would rather a magazine cater more to my tastes and more toward the tastes of its general subscription population.

    5-0 out of 5 stars The Best Overall Travel Magazine I Have Found
    I think that in terms of overall content presented, 'Conde Nast Traveler' is the best travel magazine currently on the market. Some other reviewers have raised some valid points concerning article length, and bias toward upscale properties. I think that there are other magazines that might be more suitable for others, including 'Budget Travel' and 'National Geographic Traveler', both of which I also subscribe to and enjoy, though they both have their limitations and issues as well.

    So what sets 'Conde Nast' apart? I think it is the willingness to find new and exciting vacation destinations that are still reasonable enough to get to as to make them worthwhile to a large audience. Some of the more exotic magazines have great articles on hiking in Tibet and the like, but how many people are really able to do that (or can afford to do it?) My point is that although it is by no means perfect, I think the editors and writers do consciously strike a balance between the too mundane and too exotic (and expensive) and attempt to focus the majority of the magazine in that area.

    This is just too good of a magazine to pass up. The 'Deals of the Month' section alone justifies the price. Of all the travel magazines I read on a monthly basis (currently four) 'Conde Nast Traveler' is my favorite and I highly recommend it.

    4-0 out of 5 stars used to be...
    I used to love this magazine.It still has some excellent articles, but it is true that there are way too many filler issues now with top 100 lists of things I have no interest in (resort hotels, spas, expensive travel agents).However, on the flip side, it never talks down to the reader - the audience is assumed to be well travelled and somewhat sophisticated - which I appreciate.I checked out Nat Geographic Traveller hoping it would be like the CN Traveller of old, but although it has nicer photography (with few gratuitously scantily clad female shots), it seemed much more mainstream - like I had already done many of the "dream trips" befor I hit my 30s and the information also seemed much shallower.I like Geo, but I struggle through the French and it's a lot more expensive. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7PG
    Subjects:  1. Travel   


    $15.00

    National Geographic Adventure
    by National Geographic Society
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
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    list price: $39.50 -- our price: $14.95
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    5-0 out of 5 stars Great magazine on Many Fronts!
    I am not a magazine reader at all. Adventure is the only magazine I have a subscription to (going on my 3rd year). It has great photography, travel journals, spotlights on different place to visit (i.e. South Africa). It also is fantastic if you are an avid outdoorsman/woman. The cover a lot camping, rafting, kayaking, etc. Well written, informative, great pictures. Always finding new places to write about. Good read every month - and CHEAP!

    5-0 out of 5 stars National Geographic Adventure
    I don't know what the person was thinking who reviewed this magazine (Jan 2004) and said he had cancelled his subscription of 15 years.This magazine only first began publication a few years ago.I have every issue and have loved and read every one.Adventure is the best of the National Geographic publications and is for those who are young or at least young at heart.Some of the articles are a bit sassy -- but just enough to make them fun!

    3-0 out of 5 stars Not what it used to be.
    I have just cancelled my subscription to National Geographic Magazine after 15 years of membership.Regrettably the magazine has lost its former lustre and has become too americanized and too focussed upon 911 and the two wars in the middle east.I need a magazine that is truely worldly in scope and covers nature and cultural diversity.My search led me to three candidates: Geo Magazine - good but not available in english; Geographical - british, good but a little shallow; and finally I settled upon CNN Traveller - an excellent magazine to which I am now subscribed and is all and more than what National Geographic used to be.I just wish more publishers would give National Geographic some competition.

    Paul ... Read more

    Asin: B00005Q7DY
    Sales Rank: 91
    Subjects:  1. Nature & Wildlife    2. Travel    3. Geography   


    $14.95

    Smithsonian
    by Smithsonian
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $48.00 -- our price: $12.00
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    5-0 out of 5 stars The most fulfilling magazine to read cover to cover
    Even if you can only afford the time to read a sporadic issue here or there, this is by far the most gratifying magazine to read.

    This is more like an encyclopedia of current events affecting out world than a magazine.The gamut of topics is amazing and can in one article cover a topic with comprehensive, excellent writing.The consistency of quality makes it a number once choice.

    It continues to carry the most intriguing articles I have ever read.If you're thinking about a subscription- pick one up at a newstand and revel in the pages of information.Chances are good you'll be so impressed you won't hesitate to indulge in a subscription to satisfy your appetite for more.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Look forward to every issue
    I started receiving Smithsonian magazine a few months ago.It was the best choice I could have made in selecting a magazine.I find myself reading the articles out loud to my husband.I want to read every article because I am afraid I am going to miss something.I am saving them so my young son can enjoy them when he is older.

    5-0 out of 5 stars We are impressed with every issue
    Every issue we get, we say the same thing: "WOW! This is the best issue ever!! Just look at this article, and this one...."

    We took a visit to the Smithsonian in Washington, hosting some guests from Germany who had the treasures of the mineral exhibit on their "must see first time to the US" list of attractions. We were a bit nonplussed by this--we didn't know that foreigners would be interested in the Smithsonian Museum. We spent an entire day, seeing just a small percentage of thenational treasures in this montsrous museum complex. While we were shopping in one of the gift shops, we were offered a membership. We signed up to support the Smithsonian and to get this magazine.

    Recently, there was an article on Cambodia's huge temple complex Ankhor Wat (filmed in "Lara Croft"), an article on sled dogs and an article onthe Kansas-Nebraska Act, a key law that added to the tinder sparking the Civil War. And best of all, an article on Diane Arbus, the photographer who was famous for her portraits of seemingly ordinary people, somehow caught with an eye to freakishness or evil. Though I've been familiar with Arbus' work for year, this article had so much new information.

    If you like magazines about nature, culture and history, this is the one to get. We get excited by every issue. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005Q7DP
    Sales Rank: 13
    Subjects:  1. History    2. Art (Arts)    3. Fine Arts   


    $12.00

    MHQ: The Quarterly Journal of Military History
    by Primedia Special Interest-History Group
    Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $39.96 -- our price: $34.95
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (3)

    5-0 out of 5 stars superfantastic
    I've been getting this magazine since it first came out years ago, and every issue is just as exciting as the first. It not only gives you the military aspect of events, but often goes into detail as to how and why these events occured, which is invaluable in itself. I can't wait for the next issue to come out, and wish it would come out more often. And the fact that it comes in hardcover format makes a nice presentation on my bookshelf. Thank you MHQ

    4-0 out of 5 stars Wide-ranging, thorough study of military history
    MHQ is perhaps the most in-depth publication of military history that is regularly available.The range of subjects span from ancient history and the battles of the Greeks, Romans, Chinese and others, to what has happened in the last 15 years/ Desert Storm.

    Most of the authors are very experienced, and the names of most of them can be found in your favorite bookstore's History section.Maps and photos help illustrate everything, and the magazine itself holds up a lot better with time than most thin-papered pages.It is surprisingly durable.

    I have used this magazine many times in preapring material for my history classes, and while it can by dry in some points, and certain topics aren't always in my interest area, its scholarly and informative efforts make it a far better than average magazine in its scope and quality.In short, its biggest drawback may be its quarterly issuance, since it seems to not come out often enough.

    5-0 out of 5 stars This magazine is an excellent source of information.
    An excellent source of military information. ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7RF
    Sales Rank: 1376
    Subjects:  1. History    2. Military History   


    $34.95

    Saturday Evening Post
    by Saturday Evening Post Society
    Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars
    Magazine
    list price: $17.94 -- our price: $14.97
    (price subject to change: see help)
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    Reviews (2)

    2-0 out of 5 stars This Is a Joke, Right?
    I was suprised to see that the Saturday Evening Post was still being printed. I happened to get a chance to examine a few of the "new" issues the other day. I guess they've gone through a format change from what I remember as the older magazines. It was almost like reading a satire of a badly made magazine. At first, I thought the magazines' only value could be the reprints of old artwork by Norman Rockwell and Liendecker. But the "new" material was so bad, it had to be done on purpose. I laughed out loud several times durring my review. I'd reccomend this magazine to anyone who enjoy the Sun, the Globe, the Weekly World News, or any print gurus who want to see how NOT to craft a magazine. It's a shame that they couldn't continue to make a respectable body of material for their readers. I'm sure Rockwell and Liendecker are rolling in their graves right about now.

    5-0 out of 5 stars Suitable for every age
    I first read this magazine when I was a little girl; my grandmother kept some old issues in our Minnesota lake cabin and on rainy days, I would curl up on the sofa and pour over the articles.I still enjoy the recipes, the amusing articles and the comic pages.It's a treat to sit down and read it! ... Read more

    Asin: B00005N7T6
    Sales Rank: 683
    Subjects:  1. Lifestyle Culture & Religion    2. General    3. Periodicals    4. Literary    5. Women's Interest    6. Family & Parenting   


    $14.97

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